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Research Highlighs from ASPECTS magazine

At risk for lung cancer? Liberati studying susceptibility factors.

Although many people are exposed to cancer-causing agents like tobacco smoke, few may develop lung cancer. Little is known about personal characteristics or pre-existing conditions that influence a person’s risk of developing lung cancer.

Pre-existing inflammation of the lung is emerging as an important risk factor in the development of cancer. Genetic background and obesity also may be involved. Read More >

ASPECTS Winter 2010

Federal Stimulus Money Boosts SIU Research

Although many people are exposed to cancer-causing agents like tobacco smoke, few may develop lung cancer. Little is known about personal characteristics or pre-existing conditions that influence a person’s risk of developing lung cancer.

Pre-existing inflammation of the lung is emerging as an important risk factor in the development of cancer. Genetic background and obesity also may be involved. Read More >

ASPECTS Autumn 2009

Bartke awarded med school's largest federal grant

Andrzej Bartke, Ph.D., professor and SIUC distinguished scholar of Internal medicine and physiology, has received an $8.6 million, five-year grant from the National Institute of Aging, a division of the National Institutes of Health. This is the largest NIH grant ever received at SIU School of Medicine.

The grant will fund a project to study the effects of growth hormone (GH) on aging and longevity. Dr. Bartke is the lead investigator for the project, "The Somatotropic Axis and Health Aging: A Search for Mechanisms," which includes collaborators at four other institutions. Read More >

ASPECTS Summer 2009

SIU Involved in National Studies for Alzheimers Disease
Three clinical trials under way

Currently three clinical trials at SIU are testing drug therapies that may benefit patients who may have Alzheimer disease. Dr. Tom Ala is principal investigator for all three trials. SIU is one of only three centers in the United States conducting a study of raloxifene, a selective estrogen receptor modulator, to see if it can slow the decline and perhaps improve the cognitive function of post-menopausal women with probable AD. Sponsors and collaborators on this study are Indiana University, Kaiser Permanente, and Stanford University. Dr. Ala is currently recruiting patients. Eligible women must be at least 60 years old, have gone through menopause, and meet diagnostic criteria for probable Alzheimer Disease of mild or moderate severity. The National Institutes of Health, the National Institute on Aging and SIU are funding this study. Patients also are being recruited for a clinical trial that is evaluating a monoclonal antibody called bapineuzumab to see if it may help control the progression of probable AD. Read More >

ASPECTS Winter 2009