Program

Industry supported mini-symposia and presentations, as well as the poster session, are not designated for AMA PRA Category 1 credit. These sessions are indicated in the program by blue shading.

 

Wednesday, March 26, 2014

14:00 – 18:00    Registration at the International Conference Centre (CICG)

16:30 – 17:00    Opening Lecture 1: Adriano Aguzzi (Zurich, Switzerland)

Toxicity of prions and prionoids: implications in neurodegenerative diseases

17:00 – 17:30    Opening Lecture 2: Stylianos Antonarakis (Geneva, Switzerland)

Chromosome 21 and cognition

17:30 – 18:00    Welcome address:

Ezio Giacobini, Gabriel Gold, Organizers
Arnaud Perrier, Head of the Department of Internal Medicine, Rehabilitation and Geriatrics, Geneva University Hospitals, Geneva
Bertrand Levrat, General Director, Geneva University Hospitals
Henri Bounameaux, Dean, University of Geneva Faculty of Medicine, Geneva
Linda Toth, Associate Dean for Research and Faculty Affairs, Southern Illinois University School of Medicine, Springfield, USA
Mauro Poggia, Minister of the Department of Employment, Social Affairs and Health, Republic and Swiss Canton of Geneva

18:00 – 19:00     Welcome Reception: CICG

Thursday, March 27, 2014

Room A

 Chair: Dennis Selkoe

08:15 – 08:35    State of the art lecture
Karen Ashe (Minneapolis, USA)
The relevance of quaternary structure to the functional effects of amyloid-β oligomers in the brain

A-beta, Oligomer – Prion Interactions: A Pivotal Role in AD?
Chairs: Dennis Selkoe and Christian Lüscher

08:35 – 08:55   Dennis Selkoe (Boston, USA)
 Use it or lose it: environmental novelty, β2-adrenergic signaling, and the prevention ofoAβ toxicity

08:55 – 09:15    
William Klein (Evanston, USA)
PrP – A piece of the puzzle, but where does it fit?

09:15 – 09:35   Stephen Strittmatter (New Haven, USA)
A synaptotoxic pathway from Aβ oligomer to prion protein to mGuR5 to Fyn kinase in Alzheimer’s disease

09:35 – 09:55

Charles Glabe (Irvine, USA)
Intracellular amyloid and the neuronal origin of neuritic plaques

09:55 – 10:25    Break

 Chair: Eliezer Masliah

10:25 – 10:45    State of the art lecture

John Morris (St. Louis, USA)
Dominantly inherited Alzheimer’s disease, an opportunity for early intervention

A-beta Oligomers: Where are they? What do they do? How can we fight them?
Chairs: Eliezer Masliah and Roger Nitsch

10:45 – 11:05

Ezio Giacobini (Geneva, Switzerland)
Mid-range molecular weight oligomers in the normal and Alzheimer brain: Clinico-pathological correlations

11:05 – 11:25

Tiziana Borsello (Milano, Italy)
A new APP mutation prevents synaptic degeneration in Alzheimer’s disease model

11:25 – 11:45

Roger Nitsch (Zurich, Switzerland)
Recombinant human-derived monoclonal antibodies against A-beta aggregates for for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease

Eliezer Masliah (San Diego, USA)
Small molecules targeting the formation of neurotoxic oligomers for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease: a second look

12:05 – 13:30     Lunch

Communicating the Diagnosis of Alzheimer’s Disease: Dilemmas and Perspectives
Chair: Serge Gauthier

13:30 – 13:35

Serge Gauthier (Montreal, Canada)
Opening remarks

13:35 – 13:55

Keith Johnson (Boston, USA)
Disclosing amyloid PET results when elevated amyloid confers clinical trial eligibility

13:355 – 14:15

Bruno Dubois (Paris, France)
Communicating the diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease: When and why?

14:15 – 14:35

Serge Gauthier (Montreal, Canada)
Issues to consider when communicating the diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease

14:35 – 14:50

Jean Georges (Luxembourg)
The value of knowing: Findings from Alzheimer Europe’s five country survey on public Perceptions on Alzheimer’s disease

14:50 – 14:55

Serge Gauthier (Montreal, Canada)
Summary

14:55 – 15:10

Expert Panel and Q&A
(mini-symposium supported by Eli Lilly and Company)

15:10 – 15:40     Break

Bringing Clarity to Alzheimer’s Diagnosis
Chair: Philip Scheltens

15:40 – 16:00

Dietmar Thal (Ulm, Germany)
Diagnostic value of flutemetamol amyloid PET: comparison between imaging and neuropathology

16:00 – 16:20

Victor Villemagne (Melbourne, Australia)
New developments in molecular imaging of the pathology of neurodegeneration

Philip Scheltens (Amsterdam, The Netherlands)
Clinical value of amyloid imaging: the Dutch experience

16:40 – 17:00

Andrew Satlin (Woodcliff Lake, USA)
Use of PET imaging to screen subjects for trials in prodromal Alzheimer’s disease, and the relationship between PET and CSF findings

17:00 – 17:20

Cynthia Lemere (Boston, USA)
18F-GE180 PET imaging of neuroinflammation in aging and Alzheimer’s disease in mice
(mini-symposium supported by GE Healthcare)

(18F) Flutemetamol is being investigated clinically by GE Healthcare as an amyloid imaging agent under development and has not yet been approved by any regulatory authorities in Europe JB5838 03-2014

17:20 – 18:30    Poster viewing and discussion

 

Thursday, March 27, 2014

Room B

Alzheimer’s Disease: To Prevent is Better than to Treat
Chairs: Laura Fratiglioni and Jean-Luc Reny

08:15 – 08:35

Laura Fratiglioni (Stockholm, Sweden)
Aging without dementia: only a dream?

08:35 – 08:55

Miia Kivipelto (Stockholm, Sweden)
Multi-domain intervention studies to prevent dementia and Alzheimer’s disease

08:55 – 09:15

Bruno Vellas (Toulouse, France)
Preventive drug trials in Alzheimer’s disease

09:15 – 09:35

Emiliano Albanese (Geneva, Switzerland)
Dementia in the developing world: risk, impact, and prevention

09:35 – 09:55

Serge Gauthier (Montreal,Canada)
How aggressive should prevention treatments be against Alzheimer’s disease?

09:55 – 10:25     Break

 Chair: William Jagust

10:25 – 10:45     State of the art lecture:

Manfred Windisch (Graz, Austria)
Why did animal models fail to show the right way to Alzheimer therapy?

Determinants of Cognition in Older Individuals: A-Beta or Other Pathology?
Chairs: William Jagust and Maria Carrillo

10:45 – 11:05     

Reisa Sperling (Boston, USA)
The aging brain: does amyloid matter?

11:05 – 11:25     

Claudia Kawas (Irvine, USA)
Longitudinal cognitive performance in the oldest-old with no dementia A-Beta or other pathologies?

11:25 – 11:45     

Constantin Bouras (Geneva, Switzerland)
The aging brain: beta-amyloid does not matter

11:45 – 12:05     

William Jagust (Berkeley, USA)
Is neurodegeneration caused by A-beta?

12:05 – 13:30    Lunch

 Chair: Claudio Cuello

13:30 – 13:50    State of the art lecture:

Robert Vassar (Chicago, USA)
BACE1 inhibitors: still a target for Alzheimer therapy?

Good and Bad Inflammation in the Progression of Alzheimer’s Disease
Chairs: Claudio Cuello and Rudolph Tanzi


13:50 – 14:10

Claudio Cuello (Montreal, Canada)
Early and late inflammation in Alzheimer pathology

14:10 – 14:30

Rudolph Tanzi (Boston, USA)
Decoding Alzheimer’s in the age of genome-wide analyses

14:30 – 14:50

Agneta Nordberg (Stockholm, Sweden)
Astroglia and microglia imaging markers in the progression of Alzheimer’s disease

14:50 – 15:10

John Breitner (Montreal, Canada)
Anti-inflammatory treatments and Alzheimer’s disease: a double-edged sword?

15:10 – 15:40    Break

 Chair: Howard Bergman

15:40 – 16:00    State of the art lecture:

Orazio Zanetti (Brescia, Italy)
Non-pharmacological intervention for memory decline

Caring for Patients with Dementia
Chairs: Howard Bergman and Birgitta Martensson

16:00 – 16:20

Frauke Müller (Geneva, Switzerland)
Oral care and dementia

16:20 – 16:40

Dina Zekry (Geneva, Switzerland)
Acute care units for Alzheimer patients

16:40 –17:00

Howard Bergman (Montreal, Canada)
Developing and implementing provincial Alzheimer strategies lessons learned from the Quebec Alzheimer plan

17:00 – 17:20

Jean-François Démonet (Lausanne, Switzerland)
Approach to care for Alzheimer patients in Switzerland: the example of the Canton de Vaud

17:20 – 18:30     Poster viewing and discussion

Friday, March 28, 2014

Room A

 Chair: Luc Buée

08:15 – 08:35     State of the art lecture:

Christoph Hock (Zurich, Switzerland)
Advances in active and passive immunotherapy for Alzheimer’s disease

The Inge Grundke Iqbal Lectures on TAU (from 08:35 – 11:45)
Tau-Oriented Therapy: One or Several Targets?
Chairs: Luc Buée and Khalid Iqbal

08:35 – 08:55

Luc Buée (Lille, France)
Which Tau species are toxic? Consequences for therapeutic approaches

08:55 – 09:15

Khalid Iqbal (Staten Island, USA)
The merits of activation of protein phosphatase-2A as a therapeutic approach to
Alzheimer’s disease and related tauopathies

09:15 – 09:35

Eva Mandelkow (Bonn, Germany)
A cascade linking A-beta through Tau missorting to destruction of dendritic microtubules by spastin

09:35 – 09:55

Michal Novak (Bratislava, Slovak Republic)
First in man tau vaccine (supported by Axon Neuroscience GmbH, Slovak Republic)

09:55 – 10:25    Break

Moving from A-beta to Tau
Chairs: Eva Mandelkow and Michal Novak

10:25 – 10:45

Ezio Giacobini (Geneva, Switzerland)
Alzheimer Therapy: why should we move from a-beta to TAU

10:45 – 11:05

Claude Wischik (Aberdeen, UK)
TauRx global phase 3 trial in Alzheimer’s disease with tau aggregation inhibitor LMTX (supported by TauRx, UK)

11:05 – 11:25

Eugeen Vanmechelen (Gent, Belgium)
Tau as a translational biomarker in cerebrospinal fluid and plasma (supported by TauRx, UK)

11:25 – 11:45

Michael Pontecorvo (Philadelphia, USA)
Update on Tau imaging with F18-T807

Chair: Eva Mandelkow

11:45 – 12:05     State of the art lecture:

François Herrmann (Geneva, Switzerland)
Vascular risk factors, professional activity, life expectancy and memory complaints

12:05 – 13:30     Lunch

Apathy in Alzheimer’s Disease
Chair: Bruno Vellas (Toulouse, France)

13:30 – 13:40     

Bruno Vellas (Toulouse, France)
Introduction

13:40 – 14:05     

Philippe Robert (Nice, France)
Diagnosis and assessment of apathy

14:05 – 14:30     

David Sultzer (Los Angeles, USA)
Neurobiology of apathy in Alzheimer’s disease – brain imaging insights and implications

14:30 – 14:55     

Krista Lanctôt (Toronto, Canada)
Challenges in pharmacotherapy of apathy in Alzheimer’s disease

14:55 – 15:10     

Questions and Discussion

(mini-symposium supported by F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd, Basel)

15:10 – 15:40     Break

15:40 – 16:00    

Chair: Agneta Nordberg

State of the art lecture: Adam Fleisher (Phoenix, USA)
Neuroimaging in autosomal dominant Alzheimer’s disease

Advances in Neuroimaging
Chairs: Agneta Nordberg and Giovanni Frisoni

16:00 – 16:20

Agneta Nordberg (Stockholm, Sweden)
The value of multi-PET tracer imaging for Alzheimer’s disease therapy evolution

16:20 – 16:40

Victor Villemagne (Melbourne, Australia)
Recent advances in tau imaging

16:40 – 17:00

Kejal Kantarci (Rochester, USA)
Multi-tracer imaging concept in Alzheimer’s disease

17:00 – 17:20

Giovanni Frisoni (Geneva, Switzerland)
Integrating imaging and non imaging markers into a clinical context

Friday, March 28, 2014

Room B

Chair: Jean-François Démonet

08:15 – 08:35      State of the art lecture:

Kaj Blennow (Mölndal, Sweden)
CSF biomarkers for Alzheimer’s disease: state of the art and new developments

Non Alzheimer’s Disease Dementia
Chairs: Jean-François Démonet and Frédéric Assal

08:35 – 08:55

Clive Ballard (London, UK)
Treatment of psychosis in Parkinson’s disease and Parkinson’s disease dementia

08:55 – 09:15

David Irwin (Philadelphia, USA)
Parkinson’s disease dementia: at the crossroads of α-synuclein, tau and
amyloid-β

09:15 – 09:35

Rodger Elble (Springfield, USA)
Is essential tremor a dementing neurodegenerative disease?

09:35 – 09:55

Ian McKeith (Newcastle, UK)
The spectrum of dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) – prodromal to end-stage

09:55 – 10:25     Break

Chair: Nick Fox

10:25 – 10:45

State of the art lecture: Nick Fox (London, UK)
Brain atrophy in MCI and presymptomatic neurodegeneration: insights from, and advantages of, longitudinal studies

10:45 – 11:05

State of the art lecture: Gunhild Waldemar (Copenhagen, Denmark)
Effect of physical exercise on Alzheimer’s disease

Oral Communications I
Chairs: Gunhild Waldemar and Urs Mosimann

11:05 – 11:20

Reto W. Kressig (Basel, Switzerland)
Gait analysis as an early marker for Alzheimer’s disease

11:20 – 11:35

Andreas Monsch (Basel, Switzerland)
Braincheck: A new screening tool for cognitive impairment in the elderly – combining patient assessment with caregiver information

11:35 – 11:50

Urs Mosimann (Bern, Switzerland)
Visual symptoms and their management in dementia

11:50 – 12:10

Jean-François Démonet (Lausanne, Switzerland)
Biomarkers and the neuropsychology of the ageing brain cognitive diseases
(supported by Vifor Pharma Ltd)

12:10 – 13:30     Lunch

Emerging Novel Therapeutic Targets I
Chair: Giancarlo Pepeu

13:30 – 13:50

Oscar Lopez (Pittsburgh, PA, USA)
Alzheimer’s management by Albumin replacement (AMBAR)
(supported by Grifols)

13:50 – 14:10

Gerhard Koenig (Watertown, USA)
Encenicline: An A7 co-agonist therapy for cognitive impairment in Alzheimer’s disease and other diseases

14:10 – 14:30

Moussa Youdim (Haifa, Israel)
Multi target drugs targeting mitochondrial biogenesis and neurorestauration

14:30 – 14:50

TBA
A novel multipotent sigma 1/M1 muscarinic activator for a comprehensive therapeutic strategy in Alzheimer’s disease

14:50 – 15:10

Elena Marcello (Milano, Italy)
Is ADAM-10 a valid target for Alzheimer therapy?

15:10 – 15:40     Break

Chair: Hilkka Soininen

15:40 – 16:00     State of the art lecture:

Amos Korczyn (Ramat Aviv, Israel)
The neglected targets in Alzheimer’s disease prevention and treatment

Emerging Novel Therapeutic Targets II
Sokratis Papageorgiou and Hilkka Soininen

16:00 – 16:20

Fiorella Casamenti (Florence, Italy)
Oleuropein aglycon counteracts AD-like pathology and cognitive impairments: an In vivo preclinical study

16:20 – 16:40

Hilkka Soininen (Kuopio, Finland)
A clinical trial investigating the effects of Souvenaid in prodromal Alzheimer’s disease:
progress and baseline characteristics of the lipididiet study

16:40 – 17:00

Ilse van Straaten (Amsterdam, The Netherlands)
The role of EEG in clinical trials on Alzheimer’s disease
(supported by Nutricia Advanced Medical Nutrition)

17:00 – 17:20

Peter Johannsen (Copenhagen, Denmark)
Managing synapses in Alzheimer’s disease
(supported by Nutricia Advanced Medical Nutrition)

Saturday, March 29, 2014

Room A

Plenary Session
Alzheimer Therapy 2014: Where Are We Going?
Chairs: Bengt Winblad and Lon Schneider

08:15 – 08:35   

Lon Schneider (Los Angeles, USA)
What we expect from future trials

08:35 – 08:55

Bruno Dubois (Paris, France)
Asymptomatic individuals at risk for Alzheimer’s disease: who are they and what can we do with them?

08:55 – 09:15

Bengt Winblad (Stockholm, Sweden)
Shifted focus for target oriented basic research in Alzheimer’s disease

09:15 – 09:35

Valentina Mantua (Rome, Italy)
A regulatory perspective on Alzheimer’s disease drug development

09:35 – 09:55

General Discussion

09:55 – 10:25     Break

Chair: Hermona Soreq

10:25 – 10:45     State of the art lecture:

Daniel Michaelson (Tel Aviv, Israel)
Focusing on ApoE: a viable strategy for Alzheimer therapy

Emerging Novel Therapeutic Targets III
Chairs: Yasuyuki Nomura and Hermona Soreq

10:45 – 11:05

Yasuyuki Nomura (Kurume, Japan)
A novel therapeutic target against Alzheimers’ disease: HRD1 as endoplasmic reticulum stress-related ubiquitin ligase

11:05 – 11:25

Haiyan Zhang (Shanghai, China)
A novel natural derivative with promising efficacy on brain ischemic injury

11:25 – 11:45

Hermona Soreq (Jerusalem, Israel)
Deregulated microRNA-132-3p in Alzheimer’s disease

11:45 – 12:05

Paulo Fontoura (Basel, Switzerland)
Next frontiers in Alzheimer’s disease therapy

12:05 – 13:30     Lunch

Emerging Novel Therapeutic Targets IV
Chairs: Bekka Solomon and Illana Gozes

13:30 – 13:50

Rajiv Jalan (London, UK)
Albumin as a potential therapeutic agent in Alzheimer’s disease
(supported by Grifols)

13:50 – 14:10

Henry Riordan (King of Prussia, USA)
Novel targets, innovative methodology, and implications for clinical development
(supported by Worldwide Clinical Trials)

14:10 – 14:30

Illana Gozes (Ramat Aviv, Israel)
NAP (davunetide) mechanism of microtubule/autophagy protection: discovery of new therapeutic targets and pipeline products

14:30 – 14:50

Beka Solomon (Ramat Aviv, Israel)
Down-regulation of APP processing reduce TAU and AB pathology

14:50 – 15:10

Valentina Garibotto (Geneva, Switzerland)
Cognitive and behavioral reserve in Alzheimer’s disease: PET studies

15:10 – 15:30

Susan Abushakra (San Mateo, USA)
Agitation and aggression in Alzheimer’s disease (AD): Study design and outcome measures in a trial of scyllo-inositol (ELND005 HARMONY AD Study)

15:30 – 15:40

Closing Remarks

18:30 – 22:00     Speakers dinner (by invitation)

Saturday, March 29, 2014

Room B

08:15 – 09:55    

Plenary Session in Room A

09:55 - 10:25     Break

Chair: Pierre Pollak

10:25 – 10:45     State of the art lecture:

Martin Farlow (Indianapolis, USA)
Cholinesterase inhibitors and Alzheimer Therapy: twenty years of experience

Dementia and Vascular Pathology
Chairs: Pierre Pollak and Lenore Launer

10:45 – 11:05

Gabriel Gold (Geneva, Switzerland)
Vascular damage: a common target in most old age dementias

11:05 – 11:25

Lenore Launer (Bethesda, USA)
Studying life-long vascular risk for late life dementia

11:25 – 11:45

Ingmar Skoog (Göteborg, Sweden)
New criteria for vascular cognitive impairment

11:45 – 12:05

David Werring (London, UK)
MRI markers of microvascular pathology and haemorrhagic risk

12:05 – 13:30     Lunch

Oral communications II
Chairs: Alessandro Padovani and Magda Tsolaki

13:30 – 13:45

Philippe Huber (Geneva, Switzerland)
Evaluation of driving in dementia: An issue of mobility and safety

13:45 – 14:00

Robert Alexander (Cambridge, MA, USA)
AZD3293 A novel BACE1 inhibitor: safety, tolerability, and effects on plasma and CSF
Aβ peptides following single- and multiple-dose administration

14:00 – 14:15

Tristan Bolmont (Lausanne, Switzerland)
Repeated peripheral administration of adult mesenchymal stem cells has a positive impact
on Abeta amyloid pathology in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease

14:15 – 14:30

Giacomo Koch (Rome Italy)
D2 agonist administation restores altered cortical plasticity in Alzheimer’s disease patients

14:30 – 14:45

Alessandro Padovani (Brescia, Italy)
Dementia 3-months after stroke is due to medial temporal atrophy

14:45 – 15:00

Magda Tsolaki (Thessaloniki, Greece)
New technologies and dementia

15:00 – 15:15

Enikö Kövári (Geneva, Switzerland)
Are older brains getting younger? Changes in cerebral amyloid deposition over a 30-year period

15:15 – 15:30

Carina Wattmo (Malmö, Sweden)
Factors that affect lifespan in mild versus moderate Alzheimer’s disease

15:30 – 15:40

Closing Remarks in Room A

18:30 – 22:00     Speakers dinner (by invitation)