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CRR HISTOLOGY Respiratory System

SELF-ASSESSMENT QUESTIONS

NOTE: The following questions are designed for introductory drill (i.e., to practice basic vocabulary and description of cell structure and function in the respiratory system). 
These questions do not necessarily represent the quality of questions which will appear on the CRR Unit evaluation.

(reference:  http://www.siumed.edu/~dking2/crr/cvguide.htm).

     [An mp3 file of this question set has been recorded by SIUC Anthropology student M. Campbell.]

Other topics:

SAQ slides
SAQ, Introduction -- microscopy, cells, basic tissue types, blood cells.
SAQ, Cardiovascular System.
SAQ, Renal System.

 


Multiple choice questions.

Point to an answer.  Green color and bold indicates "CORRECT."  Red color and italics indicates "Wrong answer." 
(NOTE:  In cases where all of the responses are correct, only "all of the above" will be indicated as correct.)

  1. Which epithelial cell surface specialization is used to move mucous and particles along the surface?
    1. cilia
    2. stereocilia
    3. desmosomes
    4. microvilli
    5. villi
       
  2. Pseudostratified columnar, ciliated epithelium is found lining the:
    1. nasal cavities.
    2. crypts of pharyngeal tonsils.
    3. bronchi.
    4. trachea.
    5. all of the above
       
  3. The cell type in the olfactory epithelium whose nuclei are positioned most apically is the:
    1. olfactory receptor cell.
    2. goblet cell.
    3. sustenacular cell.
    4. clara cell.
    5. basal cell.
       
  4. The most numerous cell type in the olfactory epithelium, whose nuclei are positioned at several levels in the lower portion of the epithelium, is the:
    1. olfactory receptor cell.
    2. goblet cell.
    3. sustenacular cell.
    4. clara cell.
    5. basal cell.
       
  5. Olfactory receptor cells:
    1. have several extremely long cilia for extensive exposure of receptor surface membrand.
    2. can be replaced by cell division, when worn out or damaged.
    3. are supported by sustentacular cells.
    4. are nerve cells with axons extending through the cribriform plate into the olfactory bulb of the brain.
    5. all of the above
       
  6. Nasal mucosa includes:
    1. pseudostratified, ciliated columnar epithelium.
    2. lamina propria.
    3. seromucous glands.
    4. venus plexuses.
    5. all of the above
       
  7. Small sero-mucous glands may be found in the mucosa of the:
    1. nasal cavity.
    2. nasal sinuses.
    3. trachea.
    4. bronchi.
    5. all of the above
       
  8. In which of the following are goblet cells most frequent?
    1. trachea
    2. bronchus
    3. bronchiole
    4. alveolus
    5. The frequency of goblet cells in each of the above is about equal.
       
  9. As respiratory passages branch from trachea to bronchioles, the epithelium gradually changes from:
    1. simple squamous to ciliated, pseudostratified columnar.
    2. simple columnar to simple squamous.
    3. simple cuboidal to simple columnar.
    4. stratified squamous to simple squamous.
    5. ciliated, pseudostratified columnar to simple cuboidal.
       
  10. Simple squamous epithelium lines the:
    1. nasal cavities.
    2. crypts of pharyngeal tonsils.
    3. bronchi.
    4. trachea.
    5. alveoli.
       
  11. Alveolar type I cells are:
    1. cuboidal cells that secrete surfactant.
    2. squamous cells involved in gas exchange.
    3. ciliated cells that move mucous.
    4. columnar cells that secrete mucous.
    5. amoeboid, phagocytic cells that clean the alveolar surface.
       
  12. Alveolar type II cells are:
    1. cuboidal cells that secrete surfactant.
    2. squamous cells involved in gas exchange.
    3. ciliated cells that move mucous.
    4. columnar cells that secrete mucous.
    5. amoeboid, phagocytic cells that clean the alveolar surface.
       
  13. Alveolar dust cells (macrophages) are:
    1. cuboidal cells that secrete surfactant.
    2. squamous cells involved in gas exchange.
    3. ciliated cells that move mucous.
    4. columnar cells that secrete mucous.
    5. amoeboid that clean the alveolar surface.
       
  14. The entire alveolar wall or septum (separating adjacent alveoli) consists of:
    1. surface epithelium.
    2. blood vessels.
    3. connective tissue.
    4. all of the above
       
  15. Non-ciliated cuboidal cells in bronchiole epithelium that are thought to be involved in absorption or secretion are called:
    1. chief cells.
    2. clara cells.
    3. goblet cells.
    4. basal cells.
    5. Type I cells.
       
  16. The thickness of interalveolar septa separating adjacent alveoli is typically:
    1. 1 micron or less.
    2. 5 to 10 microns.
    3. 50 to 100 microns.
    4. 500 to 1000 microns.
    5. greater than 5 mm.
       
  17. The thickness of the gas-exchange membrane separating alveolar air from blood in capillaries is typically:
    1. 1 micron or less.
    2. 5 to 10 microns.
    3. 50 to 100 microns.
    4. 500 to 1000 microns.
    5. greater than 5 mm.
       
  18. The lining of the pleural cavity is:
    1. endothelium.
    2. mesothelium.
    3. pseudostratified columnar epithelium.
    4. type I pneumocytes.
    5. type II pneumocytes.
       
  19. C-shaped rings that form the framework of the trachea and help keep it open are composed of:
    1. fibro-elastic tissue.
    2. trachealis muscle.
    3. skeletal muscle.
    4. hyaline cartilage.
    5. bone.
       
  20. Which of the following is devoid of hyaline cartilage?
    1. trachea
    2. bronchus
    3. larynx
    4. bronchiole
    5. none of the above
       

 

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SIUC / School of Medicine / Anatomy / David King

http://www.siumed.edu/~dking2/crr/SAQrs.htm
Last updated:  27 April 2009 / dgk