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TIME TO SUCCEED

Completed Plan of Action (200 points)
•    Draft of plan submitted to the Director of the Academy.
•    Finalized plan with reflective statement submitted upon completion of Succeed.

Classroom Opportunities (100 points for each)
•    Developing an individualized professional action plan. (October)
•    Problem-based learning strategies. (November)
•    Coaching: Approaches, techniques, and tools. (December)
•    Assessing learners and providing constructive, targeted feedback. (January)
•    Incorporating new technologies for teaching and learning. (February)
•    Succeeding at promotion and tenure. (March)
•    Reaching out to the community to serve and teach. (April)
•    Conducting educational inquiry and research. (May)

Online Tutorials (25 points for each with submitted scenario reflections)
•    Introduction to learning theories.
•    Difficult conversations.
•    Planning for active teaching.
•    Assessment basics.
•    Promoting self-regulated learning.
•    Presentation tips and tricks.
•    Running effective meetings.

Personal Development Experiences (25-100 points each)
•    Observation and feedback session of clinical teaching.
•    Submission of medical education manuscript to symposium, conference, or journal.
•    Mentoring sessions with a self-selected mentor.
•    Reflection journal on first year at SIU School of Medicine (6-10 entries).
•    Inquiry project on an aspect of teaching or service.
•    Departmental medical education workshops (Problem-Based Learning, Simulated Patient, others arranged by department).
•    Mini-sabbatical program through the Academy for Scholarship in education (time for this week-long program must be approved and granted by faculty member’s department chair). This one-week program focuses on establishing a medical education inquiry research project, conducting a literature review, identifying collaborative research partners, and drafting a research proposal.
•    Project-based learning experience (collaboration with a DME faculty member) to integrate new approaches to teaching (instructional delivery or technology, assessment, and/or approaches to teaching).
•    Fresh Perspectives Faculty Fourms

Medical Education Events (50 points each)
•    Attendance at the Academy Innovative Speaker Series events.
•    Attendance at the Symposium for Teaching and Learning.
•    Attendance at a Medical Education conference or event (any approved expenses will be from the faculty member’s department).

Table of Learning Opportunities
Action Plans Classroom Online Modules (Coming Soon) Personal Development Collaborative Medical Education Events
Experiences
Draft of plan submitted to the Director of the Academy. Developing anindividualized professional action plan. Introduction to learning theories. Observation and feedback session of clinical teaching. Academy Innovative Speaker Series events.
Finalized plan with reflective statement submitted upon completion of Succeed. Problem-based learning strategies. Navigating difficult conversations. Submission of medical education manuscript to symposium, conference, or journal. Annual Symposium for Teaching and Learning.
  Coaching: Approaches, techniques, and tools. Planning for active teaching. Mentoring sessions with a self-selected executive mentor. Faculty Journal Club
  Assessing learners and providing constructive, targeted feedback. Assessing learning: The basics. Reflection journal on first year at SIU School of Medicine (6-10 entries). Faculty Dialogue Sessions (joint partnership between The Academy, Medical Humanities, and Office of Diversity)
  Incorporating new technologies for teaching and learning. Promoting self-regulated learning. Inquiry project on an aspect of teaching or service. Medical Education conference or event.
  Succeeding at promotion and tenure. Presentation tips and tricks. Departmental medical education workshops (Problem-Based Learning, Simulated Patient, others arranged by department).  
  Reaching out to the community to serve and teach. Running effective meetings. Mini-sabbatical program through the Academy for Scholarship in education. This one-week program focuses on establishing a medical education inquiry research project, conducting a literature review, identifying collaborative research partners, and drafting a research proposal.  
  Conducting educational inquiry and research. Introduction to educational research. Project-based learning experience (collaboration with a DME faculty member) to integrate new approaches to teaching (instructional delivery or technology, assessment, and/or approaches to teaching).  

What Happens If a Faculty Member Doesn’t Earn 1000 points?

Succeed is built on fostering self-regulated learning. Self-regulated learners are motivated to pursue learning opportunities and follow through out of intrinsic drive. As a result, there is no formal consequence for not completing the program. Those who take the initiative to complete Succeed will be formally recognized. To help new faculty members monitor their progress, we will send Succeed status letters in the middle of the academic year (December) and at the end. Department chairs will know which of their new faculty members complete the program (and consequently, which do not).

Future Engagement with the Succeed Program

Given this faculty development program uses an individualized approach and aligns with the promotion and tenure process, we anticipate faculty may wish to continue to participate in this program. It is also possible existing faculty may wish to participate. To be responsive, we will have three levels of Succeed completion available for faculty members.

Levels of Succeed
    Succeed Executive Mentor*
  Succeed Scholar
Succeed Aspirant
    Current Experienced Faculty Who Attend Mentoring Retreat
1000 points 2000 points  
    OR
    3000+ points
    Active Engagement in Succeed

 With each level, the faculty member will receive a letter from the Director of the Academy for Scholarship acknowledging their development accomplishments. Faculty who earn the level of Succeed Mentor will be asked to work with new faculty on areas of interest and/or expertise.

*Executive Mentors

Current experienced faculty who are interested in mentoring other faculty and have an interest in medical education will be invited to participate in a one-day retreat offered by the Academy for Scholarship in Education. At the retreat, they will explore the role of a mentor, coaching colleagues, and leadership strategies. Upon completing the retreat, they will be listed on the Academy for Scholarship’s Succeed Website as Executive Mentors. As Executive Mentors, they will be invited to lead round table discussions, facilitate Succeed workshops, and serve as ongoing mentors for interested new faculty.

In time, the faculty members who actively participate in Succeed will become Succeed Executive Mentors.

Succeed: A Faculty Development Program Rooted in Practice, Research, and Theory

Transforming Faculty Development

At the Third Annual International Conference on Faculty Development in the Health Professions, a faculty development symposium (consisting of 100 faculty members and practitioners) developed six general criteria associated with excellent faculty development programs4:

  1. The faculty development program takes place in an accredited professional school, is aligned with organizational mission and goals, and receives the support needed to achieve its mission.
  2. The faculty development program is systematically designed, evidence-based, and focused on improving educational practice, leadership and scholarship.
  3. The faculty development program offers breadth, depth, diversity of approaches, and longitudinal progression of learning opportunities.
  4. The faculty development program is conducted by faculty members with expertise in faculty development and builds capacity by expanding the number of individuals skilled in offering faculty development.
  5. The faculty development program engages in ongoing program evaluation and examines impact on individuals, organization and where possible the community.
  6. The faculty development program promotes innovation and scholarship in faculty development, and teaching and learning.

Built Through Collaborative Effort, Learning Theory, and Medical Education Research

Succeed has been created through the collaborative effort of department chairs, faculty, and associate deans. This program has been significantly shaped through their perspectives. In addition, Succeed is built around concepts from Transformational Learning Theory6, Adult Learning Theory3,7, and the Reflective Practitioner1,10. To create a program that is also rooted in practice, medical education research around faculty development also served as a backdrop for creating Succeed2,4,5,8,9,12,13,14,15.

References:

  1. Argyris C, Schön DA. Theory in practice: Increasing professional effectiveness. San Franciso, CA: Jossey-Bass; 1974.
  2. Cruess RL, Cruess SR, Boudreau D, Snell L, Steinert Y. Reframing medical education to support professional identity formation. Academic Medicine. 2014; 89(11): 1446-1451.
  3. Fogarty RJ, Pete BM. The adult learner some things we know. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press; 2004.
  4. Irby, D. M., O’sullivan, P. S., & Steinert, Y. Is it time to recognize excellence in faculty development programs? Medical Teacher, May 29, 2015, 1-2. doi:10.3109/0142159X.2015.1044954
  5. Kumagai A, Naidu T. Reflection, dialogue, and the possibilities of space. Academic Medicine. 2015;90(3):283-288.
  6. Meizirow J. Learning as transformation: Critical perspectives on a theory in progress. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass; 2000.
  7. Merriam SB, Caffarella RS. Learning in adulthood: A comprehensive guide. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass; 1999.
  8. Morzinski JA, Fisher JC. A nationwide study of the influence of faculty development programs on colleague relationships. Academic Medicine. 2002;77(5):402-406.
  9. Pololi LH, Knight SM, Dennis K, Franzel RM. Helping medical faculty realize their dreams: An innovative, collaborative mentoring program. Academic Medicine. 2002;77(5):377-384.
  10. Schon DA. Educating the reflective practitioner. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass; 1987.
  11. Shulman LS. From minsk to pinsk: Why a scholarship of teaching and learning. Remarks at the Annual meeting of the American Association for Higher Education in Annaheim, CA. March 29, 2000.
  12. Steinert Y. Faculty development in the new millennium: Key challenges and future directions. Medical Teacher. 2015;22(1):44-50.
  13. Steinert Y, Mann K, Centeno A, et al. A systematic review of faculty development initiatives designed to improve teaching effectiveness in medical education: BEME guide no. 8. Medical Teacher. 2015;28(6):497-526.
  14. Wilkerson L, Irby DM. Strategies for improving teaching practices: A comprehensive approach to faculty development. Academic Medicine. 1998;73(4):387-396.
  15. Wolters CA. Regulation of motivation: Evaluating an underemphasized aspect of self-regulated learning. Educational Psychologist. 2010;38(4):189-205.